Twin-Towers and Cancer a Direct Connection

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Twin Towers

Scribe: The Thinkering Staff

Email: staff@thethinkering.com

 

The New York City skyline changed forever on 11 September, 2001 when the World Trade Center’s towers imploded and fell in their footprints.  And the skyline wasn’t the only thing that changed forever.

According to the New York Post, thousands of EMTs, firefighters, police officers, civil workers and volunteers have been disproportionately effected with cancer and believed to be directly related to that fateful day in lower Manhattan more than a decade ago. 

In the last 13 years, more than 2,500 individual cases of cancer have been reported.   Just last year that number was 1360 New Yorkers fewer.

Researchers have examined and followed health records of 10,000 firefighters and found they are nearly 20 times more likely to develop cancer than those who were not exposed to the towers destruction. 

A $2.8 billion fund was established by federal law and administered by the World Trade Center Health Program that monitors and provides medical treatment for survivors of the tragedy preluded by dual plane crashes. 

The overexposure of dust, debris, and chemicals at the site increased the chances of cancer.  According to FDNY’s top medical officer, Dr. David Prezant who said in a recent interview with NY1 – the site was toxic.  The cement dust was reminiscent of dust subsequent of a bombing which lends itself to confirmation the buildings were victims of a predesigned implosion.  The pulverized concrete dust had a pH between 10 and 11, which makes it poisonous.

The New York Post reported that 115 cancer claimants have received $50.5 million – with awards ranging from $400,000 to $4.1 million.  The deadline for cancer claims ends on 12, October 2014.  

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Comments

This kind of action is APPALING , there should not be a time limit on the claims

being made, you never know who else may come up with this horrible disease as a result to this!

 

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